Fundraising Opportunity

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CLCRF teams up with The Karalee on Preston for the 2018 Christmas Appeal

What would a Christmas tree be without a few baubles sprinkled throughout it?

CLCRF’s Christmas Appeal has taken the humble ornament to the next level, teaming up with The Karalee on Preston in a unique incentive for patrons to donate.

Visitors to the venue can purchase a Bauble over the bar for any donation amount they choose and then place it on the beautiful Christmas tree.

Donors then fill in their details on the back and CLCRF will collect the Baubles and send receipts out at the end of the Christmas period. It’s that simple!

The Karalee on Preston opened in 1975 and recently won the WA’s Best Casual Dining Pub 2018 award.

CLCRF would like to thank the venue for their continued support of the 2018 Christmas Appeal.

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Dance for A Cure 2018 Sadly Cancelled

The Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation (CLCRF) regrets to announce the cancellation of Dance for A Cure for 2018. Due to lack of registrations, the event will be unable to take place on Sunday 18 November.

The event was set to raise funds for Telethon and CLCRF, a charity that funds research into cancers that affect children and their families. Childhood cancer is the single greatest cause of death from disease in Australian children, with three losing their lives to cancer every week.

Event organiser Kylie Dalton is disheartened by the event outcome stating that sadly to make the event successful, so many more registrations were needed.

“It takes a long time and a lot of people to put an event like this on, so when we are faced with a situation like this it breaks all of our hearts. I am just devastated for the dancers and the families that did register early, and have been practising to get their steps right. I know we will find a way for Dance for A Cure to come back, just maybe not in this format. I want to personally thank my volunteer team that have worked alongside of me to get us to this point and gratefully know you will come back to help with whatever we do next.”

Refunds are being offered to all registrants. An email has been sent out to all that registered, explaining the process for either seeking a refund or donating their registration cost to CLCRF. Information regarding this process can also be found on the Dance for A Cure website: danceforacure.com.au.

CLCRF Chief Executive Officer, Andrea Alexander is grateful for the efforts of all involved in putting together this event.

“We would like to thank all of the volunteers that have invested hours into Dance for A Cure and we share their disappointment and sadness that it was unable to go ahead. Thanks also to our sponsors who once again supported this event, we hope to work with them again in the future on other projects.”

The Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation sincerely apologise for the cancellation, and hope that your support for the charity will continue. With your contribution, CLCRF can continue making a difference in the lives of children and families struggling with cancer.

Should you have further questions about this event cancellation, please contact event organisers.

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Dance for A Cure – an interview with Event Organiser Kylie Dalton

Dance For A Cure is an event that raises funds for the Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation.  Taking place on Sunday 18 November in Forest place, this event is for the dancer in all of us.  The theme this year is superheroes, so get your cape on and register now on the Dance For A Cure website.

 Around The Sound spoke to the Dance For A Cure’s coordinator, Kylie Dalton.

Kylie Dalton is a superhero.  It’s a crown that doesn’t rest well on this unassuming woman.  She doesn’t wear the outward mantle, there’s no cape or amulets, no showiness at all, but spend a few moments with Dalton and you know what it’s like to be caught up in her passion and urgency to create change and better lives for the people around her.

Dalton is the coordinator of Dance For A Cure, a yearly event that has been running since 2012 to raise funds for the Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation.  The clue is in the name.  Each year, Dalton organises an event where people come together to dance and raise funds for the Foundation.

“If you only do one thing for charity this year, this should be the one.”

Here are all the reasons why.

It’s fun…
“It’s just fun.  It’s so much fun!” says Dalton.  As a committed non-dancer, even I’m warming up to the idea of joining in at this point in our conversation.  This is a woman how knows how to generate enthusiasm.

“Dance for a Cure has grown from a flash mob I did in 2012.  I had somebody approach me wanting to do this flash mob in honour of a young lady that passed away from leukaemia, and I was like, ‘I can help you with that!’  Me being me, I don’t do anything by halves; I found out later, after I’d organised the event that she was thinking about 25 people, something really small, and 700 people turned up!”

“That first year, everybody had so much fun.  There was so much joy on people’s faces.”

… But it’s not a fun run …
“The whole reason I started Dance For A Cure, is I hate fun runs.  I hate getting up at five in the morning and everybody does fun runs and bike treks, so I thought how do we put music and dance together with something that is so fundamentally important to everyone, and that is families that are going through childhood cancer.  There are so many of them, it’s the most prolific of childhood deaths.”

… And, the serious part, it’s for the kids.
As she begins to speak about her connection with the Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation and the families and children that she works with, those directly affected by cancer, Dalton immediately begins to well up.

“My motivation is that I work with kids that go through cancer.  If I can’t find some joy for them then what are we doing?  And, it’s because they can’t that we should.”

“Nobody tells the family’s story, the constant struggle.  They might be in remission, but they might end up back in hospital the next day, or the next week, or the next year.  And it also doesn’t mean that they then don’t have a lifetime of complications from the chemotherapy.  We’ve got people that have liver damage, there are so many affects from the drugs used.  They might have fought cancer and effectively won, but have they really?  Their whole life is affected.”

At this point, Dalton excuses herself and leaves the table so that she can compose herself.  This is the serious end of the conversation, the part where I learn that, behind the aura of fun, the can-do approach to her life and work, Dalton is a woman whose humanity runs deep.  After a few moments, she returns to our table, continues where she’s left off, the steel in her eyes glistening with residue of her tears.

“It’s a lifetime diagnosis, because the treatment protocols that the kids are getting at the moment are for adults and they just adjust it based on dosage and not necessarily on what a child’s body can cope with.  Children’s Leukaemia, since I’ve known them, have been funding research on how to change the protocols.  They’re so close to clinical trials, but it just takes funding.  We’re this close to finding solutions to being able to lessen the harm on the bodies of children.”

“When they become cancer free for five years they then spend the rest of their lives dealing with what it’s [chemotherapy] done to their body, their livers, their kidneys, their bones, their teeth, their eyesight, their hearing, their learning ability.  So, yes, they might have no more cancer in their body, but they are in and out of hospital for their rest of their lives dealing with the after effects.  If we can find a better way for the treatment protocols that we have now to work for kids, or targeted therapy, their outcomes could improve exponentially, and they can live much better lives than they’re living right now.  So, that’s my motivation.”

There’s not really much more that needs to be said, except to share the logistics.

The event is being held on Sunday 18 November in Forest Place from 9.30 am – 12.00 pm (no early starts).  Registration is via the Dance For A Cure website.

The theme this year is superheroes.

“This year, we’re doing a superhero dance.  So many kids are being pulled out of remission and going back to treatment at the moment, which is really, really heartbreaking, because I work with the kids.  We’ve done yellow T-shirts, which is the childhood cancer colour.  This year I wanted to do something different.  All the kids love to wear superhero outfits, so let’s get everybody dressed up in superhero costumes, or hero costumes, whoever your hero might be.  Our volunteer team chose Bonnie Tyler’s ‘Holding Out For A Hero’ as the song for people to dance to, so it will have wide appeal having been on the Shrek soundtrack and being first released when the parents were a bit younger.”

If you’re thinking of going (you definitely should), here’s a photo of Kylie Dalton.  If you don’t have a superhero costume, just come along as Kylie, she all the superhero you’ll ever need.

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One final thing.  If you’re mortally afraid of dancing, don’t be.

“Don’t get bogged down on knowing the steps or learning the steps.  It’s about supporting an incredible charity, that’s a West Australian charity, that funds research at the Telethon Kid’s Institute, which is where all of the money raised goes.”

“The biggest things it that Dance for a Cure encompasses the whole community so, whatever way you want to be involved, you can be involved.  There’s no barriers to it.”

“We’ve filmed all of the public dance piece and all the choreography is broken down into sections and it’s all online for people to be able to do.”

Register here, register now.

“Our goal is to get a thousand people to this year’s event.”

Let’s make it 10,000.

Source: Around the Sound – October 30, 2018 by Andrew Thompson

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Charity rider’s wheel power

COMO resident Katelyn Lush is one of 12 cyclists this week riding from Perth to Augusta for the Southwest Bike Trek. The journey across the South-West started on Sunday in Subiaco and has stops at Fairbridge, Preston Beach, Harvey, Eaton, Busselton and Margaret River before finishing at Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse, Augusta on Saturday.

Ms Lush, the Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation (CLCRF) executive assistant, said she was no professional cyclist but wanted to give it a crack.
“Two years ago, I cut off my 40cm long hair and shaved my head and raised $13,500 with my friend for charity so this year I thought the bike trek would be the next best thing,” she said.
“I decided to give it a crack and it seemed like a good idea.”

Ms Lush spent 10 months training in the lead-up to the 600km ride. Ms Lush has an Everyday Hero page to raise funds for CLCRF. She has currently raised over $800, beating her goal of $500, but wants to raise more. To donate go to https://bit.ly/2P8J09a.

Source: Southern Gazette (South Perth)

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South West Bike Trek: Eric Maddock speaks to 98five Sonshine FM

CLCRF Foundation member and South West Bike Trek coordinator Eric Maddock took to the microphone a couple of weeks ago on Mornings With Mike on 98five Sonshine FM to share his insights into next week’s South West Bike Trek.

In case you missed the interview you can listen below:

Next Sunday, 12 riders will embark on a six-day bike ride from Subiaco to Augusta for the Southwest Bike Trek to raise vital funds and awareness for the Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation (CLCRF).

The journey across WA’s iconic South West region, which is more than 300km, will start at Mueller Park, Subiaco, stopping off en route at Fairbridge, Preston Beach, Harvey, Eaton, Busselton and Margaret River before finishing at Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse, Augusta on Saturday 13 October.

Childhood cancer is the single greatest cause of death from disease in Australian children, with three children losing their lives to cancer every week. Childhood cancer is second only to breast cancer in terms of the number of years of life lost by the disease.

Donations to the Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation (Inc.) help fund valuable scientific research into childhood cancers. Over the past 30 years CLCRF has made amazing breakthroughs into the treatment children receive. It is because of this research that those children have an opportunity to live long and fulfilling lives.

The first ever SouthWest Bike Trek took place back in 2002 and has raised just under $700,000 for child cancer research projects over 16 years.

If you would like to donate to help Eric and his fellow riders to raise vital funds please donate now.

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Como resident Katelyn Lush to embark on 600km Southwest trek

COMO resident Katelyn Lush will be one of 12 cyclists embarking on a six-day ride from Subiaco to Augusta for the Southwest Bike Trek this Sunday. The journey across WA’s iconic South West region will start at Mueller Park, Subiaco, stopping off en route at Fairbridge, Preston Beach, Harvey, Eaton, Busselton and Margaret River before finishing at Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse, Augusta on October 13.

Miss Lush, the Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation (CLCRF) executive assistant, said although she’s not a professional cyclist, she still wanted to give it a crack.
“Two years ago I cut off my 40cm long hair and shaved my head and raised $13,500 with my friend for charity so this year I thought the bike trek would be the next best thing,” she said.
“I decided to give it a crack and it seemed like a good idea.”

Miss Lush has been training for 10 months, which has helped increase her fitness levels in the lead-up to the 600km long ride.
“I’ve been given tips and I’ve been trained as well,” she said.
“It’s been hard work, I thought I was going to pull out at the beginning of the year as it was a lot more intense than I anticipated but I stuck with it.”

Miss Lush has launched an EverydayHero page to raise funds for CLCRF. She has currently raised over $800, beating her goal of $500, but wants to raise more. To donate go to https://bit.ly/2P8J09a

Source: Western Suburbs Weekly – October 4th, 2018, 02:00PM

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Katie Lush talks to 89.7fm about the South West Bike Trek

CLCRF’s very own Executive Assistant, Katie Lush, is joining this year’s South West Bike Trek. This morning Katie spoke with Sue Myc on 89.7 Twin Cities FM’s morning show about the ride, what she’s looking forward to and why she feels the need to ride for such a good cause.

In case you missed the interview you can listen below:

 

On Sunday 7 October, 12 riders will embark on a six-day bike ride from Subiaco to Augusta for the Southwest Bike Trek to raise vital funds and awareness for the Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation (CLCRF).

The journey across WA’s iconic South West region, which is more than 300km, will start at Mueller Park, Subiaco, stopping off en route at Fairbridge, Preston Beach, Harvey, Eaton, Busselton and Margaret River before finishing at Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse, Augusta on Saturday 13 October.

Childhood cancer is the single greatest cause of death from disease in Australian children, with three children losing their lives to cancer every week. Childhood cancer is second only to breast cancer in terms of the number of years of life lost by the disease.

Donations to the Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation (Inc.) help fund valuable scientific research into childhood cancers. Over the past 30 years CLCRF has made amazing breakthroughs into the treatment children receive. It is because of this research that those children have an opportunity to live long and fulfilling lives.

The first ever SouthWest Bike Trek took place back in 2002 and has raised just under $700,000 for child cancer research projects over 16 years.

If you would like to donate to help Katie and her fellow riders raise vital funds please donate now.

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Riding to Beat Cancer

This year the Southwest Bike Trek promises to be a fantastic fundraising event for the Children’s Leukaemia & Cancer Research Foundation (Inc.) and 12 riders will embark on a six-day bike ride from Subiaco to Augusta to raise money for the CLCRF. The 588 km journey and will start at Mueller Park, Subiaco, stop en route at Fairbridge, Preston Beach, Harvey, Eaton, Busselton and Margaret River before finishing at Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse, Augusta on Saturday 13 October.

One of the riders, Katelyn Lush, also the Executive Assistant of the CLCRF, has been diligently training to participate in the trek for several months. With less than four weeks before the trek, event organiser, Eric Maddock, took Katelyn on a 66km training session from Perth to Mandurah. Katelyn successfully completed the ride in under three hours. As a result of this trial run, Katelyn says she is much more confident about completing the nearly 600 km journey.

“I have never ridden this distance in one stretch before. Every week of training I’m learning more about the world of cycling and also about myself.

“We are capable of anything if we set our minds to it and this ride on the weekend has only increased my excitement for the Bike Trek.”

Katelyn is up for the challenge of riding the trek for the first time because she knows how increased funding into child cancer research can save lives.

“I think of all the kids who aren’t able to learn how to ride a bike or go outside and play because they are in the fight of their lives to beat Childhood Cancer. If my partaking in the South West Bike Trek can raise some greatly needed funds for Child Cancer Research and raise awareness, that’s a challenge I will take on.”

We are so proud of Katelyn for her perseverance and determination to be involved in the bike trek!

If you would like to make a donation to support the Southwest Bike Trek, head over to  our make a donation page.

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Go Gold for Childhood Cancer Awareness Month in September!

September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month and we’d love you to get involved to help shine a spotlight on the need for more research and funding.

Gold is the international colour of childhood cancer awareness, with many supporters choosing to wear a gold ribbon during September.

Every year in September, childhood cancer champions, advocates and supporters encourage iconic buildings, historic landmarks, monuments, bridges and natural environments to GO GOLD. Whether lighting up gold or by displaying gold ribbons, the global effort is making a difference. We’d love for you to be ‘Our Champions’.

Please show your support for all kids fighting cancer and their families by wearing a gold ribbon purchased from CLCRF. Our combined efforts will raise awareness and improve future outcomes for children diagnosed with cancer!

You can purchase your gold ribbons or packets of sunflower seeds from us at the CLCRF office during business hours at Unit 3/100 Hay Street Subiaco WA or alternatively give us a call on (08) 9363 7400 and we can arrange to post some out to you and your workplace.

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Stunning Sunflowers Rise for Awareness

Last September, Children’s Leukaemia & Cancer Research Foundation (Inc.) (CLCRF) ‘sowed the seeds for childhood cancer awareness’ by selling sunflower seeds for Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. The sunflower seeds were a hit with supporters and many packets were sold raising over $1,800.

Linda Kelly and her grandson, Riley Kelly-Cook, sent the Foundation some photos of sunflowers that grew from the seeds they purchased from CLCRF last September.

“Best sunflowers ever. I have never grown any this large before, the neighbours were in awe.  Fantastic way to support a great cause.“

The sunflower seed packets might make a comeback this year for September Childhood Cancer Awareness Month so stay tuned!