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Climb for a Smile to Support Children with Cancer!

This event has unfortunately been canceled.

Climb for a Smile with hundreds of people on Sunday 10 September! Participants will walk or run up 50 floors (that’s 1,042 steps) of Brookfield’s 108 St George’s Terrace to raise funds for children’s charities including Children’s Leukaemia & Cancer Research Foundation (Inc.).

Hosted by Rotary WA, Climb for a Smile kicks off from 7:30am on Sunday 10 September. Corporate professionals through to school students will be walking or running up 50 floors to raise money for the charities. The climb will only take 10 minutes up to one hour depending on your fitness level. Register now!

One of the climbers on the day will be Mark Daniels, a 24-year-old Through Knee Amputee currently serving in the Royal Australian Navy, who will be going up the stairs with a prosthetic leg. After a near fatal motorbike crash in December 2015 where he lost his leg, Mark now dedicates himself to keeping fit and motivating others by using his story to inspire and educate. Mark explains why he wants to participate.

“These kids are facing something that most of us couldn’t even comprehend as adults let alone as a child. I want to show them that their disabilities don’t limit their abilities at all, when life throws you a curve ball you’ve got to hit back as hard as you can. They’ve been given the short straw and it’s going to be a huge journey but as long as they keep pushing, then they will reach the top.”

Here’s your chance to raise vital funds for cancer research for CLCRF in an active, fun event. Head over to www.climbforasmile.org.au and register yourself or your team and raise funds for CLCRF. If you have a team of greater than four, email Rob Bunning.

Podcast: Mark Daniels on 6PR – Monday 14 August – 1:45pm

Podcast: Mark Daniels on 98five with Jeziel on Drive – Friday 18 August – 4:20pm

Podcast: Mark Daniels on 6IX – Wednesday 23 August – 7:20am

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Cracking the Cancer Code for Kids

‘Excitement’ and ‘cancer’ are two words that shouldn’t really go together, until you add the word ‘hope’ to the sentence. Those are the words flowing out of the mouths of researchers from the Telethon Kids Institute in Perth as they edge closer to answering what causes pediatric cancer, thanks to funding by the Children’s Leukaemia & Cancer Research Foundation (Inc.).

Dr Mark Cruickshank, who leads the Cancer Genomics and Epigenetics team, said it has been a long road to reach the pointy end of years of research and is excited to be on the verge of cracking the cancer code for kids. “This is one project where we have no idea what causes leukaemia in infants and that’s a really big focus of mine at present, because I’m very close to finding what we think are the answers to that conundrum,” Dr Cruickshank said. “It has taken more than four years to reach this stage, by studying the gene sequencing mutations in cells. This in turn has now escalated the drug therapy studies that are built on that gene research.”

Dr Cruickshank revealed that the research team has been analysing data from cancer cells of infants to identify mutations that are not present in patients’ healthy cells. As infants are ‘brand new’ to life they have had little time for their cells to mutate outside the womb, so there is something genetic causing them to have cancer. “We’ve found some extremely exciting signals from the data, statistical signals, and now we need to test these out in the laboratory. This could be a huge advancement and it could open up a lot of different avenues, for example we could look at cohorts of patients to see if a mutation is associated with treatment outcomes,” he said.

The genetic research and understanding has been crucial to take the team to this next stage as the make-up of the leukaemia affects whether the treatments will work or not. Having a genetic understanding can cut out the guessing games so patients can receive doses of drugs that are effective and also minimise the side effects to their bodies. “We already know some drugs fail in some patients and we think this is due to the genetics,” Dr Cruickshank said.

 While researchers may have found the causes of the diseases, the next step is to develop the best treatment protocols to deliver to patients and their families.

“I don’t really think that gaining short amounts of extensions of life is where we need to end up, we really need to cure these diseases. I want to reach a point where the therapies aren’t putting the families through a year’s worth of pain and then a lifetime of uncertainty,” he said.

“I believe in finding absolute cures – and that is the goal of the research, to do that we need help. To accelerate the research we need to be able to test the drugs in all different ways and we need the best technologies. We have the capacity to do this, but it takes money to do it.”

If you would like to contribute support to Dr Cruickshank and his team’s research to help make a difference you can donate to CLCRF or contact the Foundation via email or phone +61 8 9363 7400 for further information.

Read a recent paper on infant leukaemia cell lines and drug screening published in Volume 31 of Leukemia Journal by Dr Mark Cruickshank

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Sharing a unique story of survival

Mundijong resident and cancer survivor Georgia Lowry spoke about her new book Growing Georgia at the Byford Gala Ball last month. The 22-year-old survived bone cancer* as a baby and the book details her journey. Ms Lowry said her family inspired her and that Wilma Mann the author of the book helped her put it all together. “The process was a lot of fun,” she said.

“Wilma asked me many questions that were recorded and she managed to bring my story out in a way that really reflected who I was and what I want to say.” Ms Lowry said she hoped people would read it and become more aware of bone cancer. “Just because you, a family member or a friend has cancer or an illness it is definitely not the end of the road,” she said.

“Positive thinking and the power of the mind does a lot of things. “Well, it has done for me anyway.” Ms Lowry said she was lucky and thankful for the love and support she had from her family and friends.

“I’m really focused on my role as ambassador for the Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation,” she said. “I want to help find a cure so kids like me have a better outcome.” Ms Lowry works at a childcare centre and in her spare time rides her horses three days a week in preparation for competitions on the weekends but her main aim was to help with research.

“I hope one day to find a cure,” she said. “There is always hope and if anyone needs to talk to someone reach out to me. “I have a public Facebook page and will always talk to someone going through this.” Ms Lowry said if her journey could help even just one person she would be happy.

For more information visit Facebook.com/GeorgiaLowryPublicSpeaker.

Source: Serpentine Jarrahdale Examiner Newspaper, April 13, 2017 – Page 3
Written by: Juanita Shepherd

*Story Correction – Georgia Lowry was diagnosed with and has survived Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia.

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Registration opens for fourth annual Dance for a Cure at Forrest Place

SO, you think you can dance? Hundreds of Perth families are being sought to converge on Forrest Place to perform a choreographed dance for the Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation (CLCRF).

Registration has opened for the fourth annual Dance for a Cure event, which will be directed by Lauchlan Bain, a Perth choreographer, who is working on the moves to this year’s song, Better When I’m Dancing by Meghan Trainor.

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Dance for A Cure – Train Flash Mob

On Wednesday 3 August, to launch registrations for Dance for A Cure 2016, a group of very enthusiastic and passionate dance students got together to do a train flash mob for Children’s Leukaemia & Cancer Research Foundation.  With the help of dancers from the Beverley Margaret School of Dance we were able to create our very first live Facebook event for the CLCRF. It was also filmed and sent to Channel 9 for the news later that evening.

In less than 24 hours we have had nearly 21,000 people reached. It is clear that this year will be a wonderful year for Dance for A Cure and we thank everyone involved for this support. Register Now to Dance for A Cure on 30 October 2016 by heading to www.danceforacure.com.au

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