Georgia Lowry

Bosch-Symphony

A Symphony of Love

Here’s a flashback to the past: this article was published on Monday 24 May 1999 in The West Australian when Georgia Lowry, was only 5 years of age!

Georgia was diagnosed with a rare and very aggressive form of leukaemia at just eight weeks old. Miraculously, Georgia is still with us at 22 years of age today and is a wonderful ambassador for CLCRF.

She’s photographed here laughing on top of a double bass with the German 66-piece Bosch Orchestra’s conductor, Ulrich Walddorfer. The concert was held on 24 May 1999 at the Perth Concert Hall to raise funds for Children’s Leukaemia & Cancer Research Foundation Inc. (CLCRF) and tickets went for a reasonable $15.

“I loved this photo shoot – I remember Georgia had everyone laughing,” said Andrea Alexander, Executive Officer of CLCRF, who was present at the photoshoot in 1999.

Since that time, Georgia Lowry, who is now 22, has gone from strength to strength as a CLCRF ambassador. She continues to passionately raise awareness of the need for greater funding for child cancer research.

It’s inspiring to remember the wonderful efforts of organisations like Bosch Orchestra to raise awareness and money for child cancer research!

If you’re inspired to hold an event to give to children with cancer, just start a fundraising page and share it with friends and family to raise money for CLCRF!

g-13-april17

Sharing a unique story of survival

Mundijong resident and cancer survivor Georgia Lowry spoke about her new book Growing Georgia at the Byford Gala Ball last month. The 22-year-old survived bone cancer* as a baby and the book details her journey. Ms Lowry said her family inspired her and that Wilma Mann the author of the book helped her put it all together. “The process was a lot of fun,” she said.

“Wilma asked me many questions that were recorded and she managed to bring my story out in a way that really reflected who I was and what I want to say.” Ms Lowry said she hoped people would read it and become more aware of bone cancer. “Just because you, a family member or a friend has cancer or an illness it is definitely not the end of the road,” she said.

“Positive thinking and the power of the mind does a lot of things. “Well, it has done for me anyway.” Ms Lowry said she was lucky and thankful for the love and support she had from her family and friends.

“I’m really focused on my role as ambassador for the Children’s Leukaemia and Cancer Research Foundation,” she said. “I want to help find a cure so kids like me have a better outcome.” Ms Lowry works at a childcare centre and in her spare time rides her horses three days a week in preparation for competitions on the weekends but her main aim was to help with research.

“I hope one day to find a cure,” she said. “There is always hope and if anyone needs to talk to someone reach out to me. “I have a public Facebook page and will always talk to someone going through this.” Ms Lowry said if her journey could help even just one person she would be happy.

For more information visit Facebook.com/GeorgiaLowryPublicSpeaker.

Source: Serpentine Jarrahdale Examiner Newspaper, April 13, 2017 – Page 3
Written by: Juanita Shepherd

*Story Correction – Georgia Lowry was diagnosed with and has survived Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia.